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Countdown to 29 -- Part 5

I'm cultivating a new kind of joy as I countdown to 29 and I'm in major reflection mode. For my 29th year, I'm creating a new bucket list of the 29 things I'd like to accomplish in the 365 days before my 30th birthday. I'll be listing 4 a day for the next week. [Read #1-4] [Read #5-8] [Read #9-12] [Read #13-16]

Indulge me, if you will:

17. Read individual chapters in books: so instead of trying to read every book that sounds interesting, I'm going to find a chapter or two that really peaks my interests to see if the book is something I'd want to read in it's entirety. And, not every book needs to be read in it's entirety for a chapter to make sense. I'm especially putting this into practice as I prepare for my thesis.

18. Rebuild my Sunday routine -- ever since I quit singing at my home church and working at my "work church," I haven't developed a Sunday routine that feels comfortable. Prior to this season of my life, I used to spend Sunday evenings with a person I loved and enjoyed. Thats gone . Now, Sundays are bland and boring--not what I desire out of my post-church experience. I miss fellowship and I aim to create that more in my new year.

19. Go to Queens for good food -- Listen, I like never go to Queens. But the food is so good. The one time I went for a class project, I ate at a bomb seafood restaurant. But really, it's the most diverse area of the USA and I rarely go out there aside from catching a flight. I'm going to be intentional this year about journeying to Queens for food. Who knows how much longer I'll be in NYC. Let me get to it!

20. Be more patient with my mom -- I have aging parents. Sometimes I get frustrated because my mom is moving too slow or I'm having to explain uber to her over and over again. I catch myself, so I'm growing , but it's still a task. I'm going to actively and intentionally practice patience with her from now on.

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