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Starting Over

Has 2018 been underwhelming for you? Have you still not recovered from 2017? Are you struggling with the fact that January is almost gone and you ain't kept one resolution? Or maybe, if you're like me, you didn't even have the energy to make any?

This post is for you!
Yes, you who didn't ring in the new year with high hopes
You, who spent NYE sobbing, you who began the new year soaking your sheets in tears
You, who simply didn't have the energy to make resolutions or agonize over action plans for your goals
You, who are tired of praying, disappointed with a prosperity gospel that didn't manifest in your life in 2017--It was not your season! The harvest didn't come in and you're hungry 
You, who got are weary
You, who are empty and exhausted by a year that almost killed you
You, who are angry at God

It's not to late to START OVER!

Maybe you gave up on dreaming because it was too painful to keep failing, over and over again. Maybe you're fearing what the results would be if you were to dream again, afraid the power of your dreams. Maybe you are so damaged by the people and the circumstances that disappointed you that you can't see beyond the heartbreak to get to the breakthrough. 

It's not too late to press the reset button, 
to cleanse the pallet,
to START OVER!

We have the agency to affect the change we want to see in our lives. That job that you so desperately wanted that you didn't get doesn't have power over you and your dreams. That love interest that played you doesn't have power over your romantic possibilities. That graduate program that wait-listed or rejected you can't stop your dream of being a writer or actor or doctor. You can still dream. You can still plan. You can still execute. January has been one of the most tumultuous months of my life. I certainly didn't think my 2018 would start like this. But my story doesn't end here. 2017 was a year full of blessings and anxieties, dreams and depression. But my story doesn't end there. My story doesn't end with maxing out my credit card to pay my rent. My story doesn't end with my music career coming to a severe standstill. My story doesn't end with being abandoned and rejected by people I love/loved. It doesn't end with eating one meal a day to survive. It doesn't end with the health scares, the blood tests, the chronic pain that kept/keeps me bedridden at times, the insomnia, the asthma attacks, or the tears.

I have the power--the agency--to become everything beautiful that I believe about myself. We have the power to co-create ourselves over and over again with divine guidance.

Today, I'm starting over!
Today, I'm dreaming big!
Today, I'm writing the vision and making it plain.


This morning, I attended a wonderful session, created and curated by Rev. Dr. Eboni Marshall Turman at an awesome, women-only hideout in the Flatiron district called The Wing. We didn't do the basic vision boarding or dream building exercises that can be somewhat cliche and lacking in the depth needed to hold our dreams accountable. We focused, specifically, on goals--creating smart goals and adhering to systems that will allow us to sustain those goals. I left inspired, motivated, and ready to put in the work in order to make 2018 the spectacular year that it has the potential to be. I accepted my agency in my healing--my role in the creation of this much needed breakthrough--my authority and power to turn this year around. Today, I decided to start over! The year doesn't have to end like it began. I can make goals and meet them. I can crawl outta debt. I can prepare for motherhood and partnership. I can monetize my gifts. I can deepen my spiritual well and keep it full. I can do all things!

Today, I'm starting over!
It's not too late for you.

You have the power to become everything beautiful that you believe about yourself.






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